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Address Line 1 (What Does It Mean And How To Fill It Out)

Looking for Address Line 1?

What does address line 1 mean in simple terms?

What’s essential to know?

Keep reading as we have gathered exactly the information that you need!

Let’s see what to put in the first line of an address field!

Are you ready?

Let’s get started!

What Is Address Line 1

Address Line 1 is the first line of your address where you will indicate the primary and secondary address information such as your civic number, street address, and the building or apartment number.

For example:

598 Virginia Street, Apartment 2
River Grove IL 60171
Author

In this example, the address contains two lines:

  • Address Line 1: 598 Virginia Street, Apartment 2
  • Address Line 2: River Grove IL 60171

As you can see, on the first line of the address, we’re specifying the civic number (598), the street name (Virginia Street), and the apartment number (Apartment 2).

Related article:

Components of Address Line 1

Let’s look at the different components of your address.

Part 1: Building Number

Probably the most important component of the first line of your address is the building number and street name.

The building number is essentially the number that has been assigned to your building, house, or property.

For example:

2919 Adamsville Road
Author

In this example, the property is assigned the number “2919”.

Part 2: Street Name

The second part of the first line in an address is the street name.

The street name is generally the easiest part of the address to remember as it’s generally a name or term.

For example:

4877 Timberbrooke Lane
Author

In this example, the street name is “Timberbrooke”. 

“Lane” is the street name suffix and I’ll get to that next.

Part 3: Street Suffix

The third part of address line 1 is the street suffix.

The street suffix can get confusing at times as there are potentially hundreds of different types of street suffixes possible.

In the United States, you can have suffixes like:

  • Alley
  • Cliff
  • Drive
  • Lane
  • Ridge
  • Road
  • Ville

For example:

1704 Tori Lane
Author

In this example, the street suffix is “Lane”.

Part 4: Apartment Number

The last component of address line 1 is the apartment, suite, unit, or block number.

If you live in a single-family home or a property with one building number, then you will not have an apartment number.

However, if you live in an apartment or a building where there are many people living next to one another, then you’ll need to specify their apartment number.

For example:

3839 Neuport Lane, Apartment 3
Author

In this example, you’ll need to find the physical address of the property by going to 3839 Neuport Lane.

Then, once you get there, the specific person lives in the 3rd apartment in that building.

Related article:

Address Line 1 Example

Let’s look at a few examples of Address Line 1 to see how they are written in practice.

A standardized address format is as follows:

RECIPIENT NAME
ADDRESS LINE 1
ADDRESS LINE 2
ADDRESS LINE 3
Author

As you can see, there are four lines.

Here is an example of an address where there’s a building number and street name on the first line:

Mr. John Smith
1713 Elm Drive
New York NY 10014
Author

Here is an example of an address where you have an apartment number:

Ms. Jane Doe
2717 Clarence Court, Apartment 2
Los Angeles CA 90017
Author

USPS Addressing Standards

According to the USPS, the standard way of writing an address is on three lines:

Line 1: NAME
Line 2: STREET ADDRESS
Line 3: CITY, STATE, ZIP CODE
Author

On the first address line, you must indicate the recipient’s name.

Then, you’ll need to put the street address on the second address line.

Then, you’ll put the city, state, and zip code on the last and third line.

For example:

Line 1: Ms. Helen Smith
Line 2: 4759 Walkers Ridge Way
Line 3: Lemont IL 604439
Author

The USPS requires that you place the apartment number or suite number on the first line.

If you put it on the second line, it will be considered a non-standard address.

For example:

Mr. John Smith
3087 Elmwood Avenue
Unit 102
Mesa AZ 85201
Author

The USPS will consider this address as a non-standardized address as the unit number is written on the second line.

Your post office will have its recommendations as to how to complete an address in every region.

Address Form Field

There are instances when you’re asked to provide your address online or on a form and you’re given Address Line 1 and Address Line 2 fields.

Then you wonder what goes in the address line 1 field on your form?

In short, “address line 1” is just the first part of your address. 

To write your address, you’ll need to split up the different parts of your address into several lines so your postal service company can easily understand the address and process your delivery.

When you’re asked for the address line 1, you’ll need to put your street number, name of your street, and apartment number.

Sometimes, your street name will have a suffix, be sure to include that as well.

Business and law blog

Address Line 1 FAQs

Let’s look at some common questions related to how to fill out address line 1.

How do you write an address line 1?

Writing an address line 1 consists of writing your house or property number (civic number), followed by the street name, and then the apartment, unit, or suite number (if any).

What is my address line 1?

“Address line 1” is simply the first part of your address consisting of the number of your building along with your street name.

If you have an apartment number, suite number, or unit number, you’ll generally put that in Address Line 1 as well unless the line becomes way too long.

Related article:

Do you put the apartment number in the first address line?

You’ll put the apartment number in the first address line if it’s not going to make the line too long.

In other words, if you can keep your first line short even when including things like “Apartment X” or “Apt. X”, then you’re ok.

However, in some cases, the street names are so long that it would not make sense to put the entire street name and apartment number on the first line only.

In that case, you’ll split the apartment number and put it on the second line.

How do you write a PO Box address?

Typically, the PO Box is written in the following manner:

RECIPIENT NAME
STREET NUMBER AND NAME
PO BOX NUMBER
CITY, STATE, ZIP CODE
Author

In this format, the post office delivery person must first locate the physical property, and then inside that property, find your specific PO Box number.

Address Line 2: Takeaways 

So there you have it folks!

Address line 1 is simply the house number, street name and suffix, and apartment number.

That’s it!

Next time you’re asked to enter your information in the address line 1 form field, you’ll know exactly what to put in there!

Good luck!

Address meaning 
Commercial address
Indirect signature required 
Its signature 
PO box address 
Shipping address 
Street address
Author
Editorial Staff
Hello Nation! I'm a lawyer by trade and an entrepreneur by spirit. I specialize in law, business, marketing, and technology (and love it!). I'm an expert SEO and content marketer where I deeply enjoy writing content in highly competitive fields. On this blog, I share my experiences, knowledge, and provide you with golden nuggets of useful information. Enjoy!

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