Home Blog What Is Dark Pool Trading (Explained: All You Need To Know)

What Is Dark Pool Trading (Explained: All You Need To Know)

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What is a Dark Pool in stock trading?

What’s important to know about it?

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Let me explain to you what Dark Pool is and why it’s important!

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What Is A Dark Pool

In finance, a dark pool refers to a private financial forum where traders buy and sell securities outside of the public view.

In other words, those trading in dark pools can execute a transaction without revealing any information about the trade until after the transaction is executed.

Essentially, a dark pool is a type of Alternative Trading System (ATS) where investors can buy and sell securities without going through a central exchange like the NYSE or Nasdaq.

The main reason why dark pools exist is that investors are able to maintain the anonymity of the transaction so others do not become aware of the intended transaction before it is consumed.

Also, since it’s a type of ATS, institutional investors and investors can tap into liquidity for their marketable securities.

You can have different types of institutions trading in dark pools ranging from pension funds to individual investors.

However, investors should be careful when trading securities in dark pools to make sure they know who they are dealing with and understand the risks.

Keep reading as I will further break down the meaning of dark pools and tell you how it works.

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Why Dark Pools Are Important

Dark pools have been around for several decades allowing institutional investors to transact large blocks of shares without influencing the underlying market price.

When investors trade in dark pools, not only are they able to keep the anonymity of the trade, but they can also reduce their transaction costs compared to executing the same trade on a stock exchange.

The Securities and Exchange Commission in the United States allows dark pools to exist as they allow investors to reduce cost, create additional liquidity, and allow institutional investors trade large blocks of securities without adversely affecting the market.

For example, if an institutional investor is looking to offload 1,000,000 shares of a particular company, executing this transaction on a stock exchange will most certainly lead to an immediate drop in the stock price.

This is due to the selling pressure that is placed on the stock.

However, the institutional investor can sell the 1,000,000 shares in a dark pool outside of the public eye in such a way that the impact on the stock price is mitigated.

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Dark Pool Advantages

There are several advantages to trading financial products in a dark pool.

One key advantage is that institutional investors trading large blocks of securities can do so without tipping off the public.

In essence, in dark pools, institutional investors can avoid revealing the size of the trade, the identity of the parties, and the terms of the trade until the trade is filled.

Keeping the transaction private until it is completed helps maintain the securities prices and avoid unwanted volatility in prices.

Another important advantage of dark pools is that it provides investors with additional liquidity for their financial instruments.

As such, next to the stock exchanges such as the New York Stock Exchange or the Nasdaq, investors can execute trades in dark pools.

For example, the Bloomberg Tradebook is a dark pool that is owned by Bloomberg LLP and that is registered with the SEC.

This dark pool provides those who are part of this forum additional liquidity for their financial products.

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Dark Pool Drawbacks

Although institutional investors and some investors may find advantages in trading securities in dark pools, it’s important to be mindful of its drawbacks as well.

The most notable drawback to dark pools is that the forum participants are unable to see orders that are placed by other participants when buying or selling securities.

As a result, investors are unable to see trends, volumes, and market direction until after a trade is filled.

Another disadvantage of dark pools is that it is not accessible to everyone.

Typically, market participants are able to access a dark pool via private contractual arrangements and electronic trading platforms.

Also, since dark pools are used for high-frequency trading, it is possible that there may be a conflict of interest between market participants.

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Dark Pool Meaning FAQ

What is a dark pool in trading?

A dark pool refers to a private financial forum where market participants trade different types of financial products privately and away from the public eye.

Typically, the identity of investors and trade details are revealed only after the trade is filled.

Mutual funds, pension funds, hedge funds, institutional investors, and other organizations tend to use dark pools to execute large trades without causing unwanted volatility in the market.

How does a dark pool work?

Dark pools are forums where financial products and securities are traded privately.

Members of the dark pool can negotiate a trade with one another without revealing details of the order until the transaction is completed.

In dark pools, the transaction costs are generally lower than in organized public exchanges.

How are dark pools used?

Dark pools are used in a number of ways.

Institutional investors use dark pools when they move in or move out of a position without tipping off the market of the imminent transaction.

Also, dark pools are heavily used for algorithmic trading and high-frequency trading where investors trade securities without the intervention of a human.

Dark pools are also useful for investors who are looking to have an alternative form of liquidity so they are not always required to trade on a traditional public exchange.

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Takeaways 

So there you have it folks!

What does a dark pool mean in finance?

In a nutshell, a dark pool refers to a private forum where investors trade different types of financial products such as securities, derivatives, and other instruments.

The reason why it’s called a “dark” pool is that the forum is a type of alternative trading system that is outside of the public eye.

Typically, institutional investors are able to trade large blocks of securities and instruments while keeping the anonymity of their trade.

Dark books allow investors to keep the terms of a trade private, avoid price devaluation, and increase market efficiency and liquidity.

However, since these forums are not regulated like public exchanges, there is a lack of transparency, there may be unfair advantages given to some investors, and possible conflicts of interest.

Now that you know what dark pools are all about and how they work, good luck with your research!

High-frequency trading 
Iceberg orders
Price discovery
Algorithmic trading 
Activist investor
Pooled funds
Alternative trading system 
Anonymous trading
Order flow 
Author

Amir K.
Hello Nation! I'm a lawyer by trade and an entrepreneur by spirit. I specialize in law, business, marketing, and technology (and I love it!). I'm also an expert SEO and content marketer. On this blog, I share my experience, knowledge, and provide you with golden nuggets of useful information. Enjoy! Feel free to connect with me on LinkedIn.

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